About

Essex Heritage provides leadership to a coalition of stakeholders developing the Essex Coastal Scenic Byway.

The 90-mile roadway links 14 coastal communities from Lynn to Salisbury and features scenic views, period architecture, historic sites and recreational opportunities. With the twin goals of preserving the byway’s intrinsic qualities and spurring investment in its infrastructure, attractions and amenities, Essex Heritage worked to secure state scenic byway designation and federal funding for a comprehensive management plan that is guiding community and regional leaders in their efforts to implement tourism-based economic development.

Mission

Essex Heritage is a non-profit organization that takes a community-driven approach to heritage conservation and economic development. Working through public-private partnerships, Essex Heritage uses the Area’s heritage resources in new ways to engage diverse audiences, from at-risk youth to trail enthusiasts, and, in so doing, Essex Heritage has successfully advanced recognition for the value of the historic, cultural, and natural resources in the region.

History

2019

New Essex Coastal Scenic Byway website launched by Essex Heritage to promote discovery and engagement along the 90 mile roadway.

2018

Nine outdoor, graphic-rich, informational kiosks were installed in Lynn, Marblehead, Salem, Beverly, Gloucester, Essex, Ipswich, Newburyport and Salisbury. Ceremonial ribbon cuttings were held with local leaders at each kiosk location.

2017

Work begins on the scenic byway visitor center informational kiosks project. Design firm Omloop of Framingham was contracted to prepare plans and oversee fabrication and installation.

2016

Over 200 directional signs bearing the scenic byway logo are installed along the entire 90-mile route and six access routes (Rtes. 129, 114, 133, 113, 110) by RoadSafe Traffic Systems of Avon

2014

Work begins on the scenic byway signage project; engineering firm Greenman-Pedersen, Inc. of Wilmington contracted to prepare plans, specifications and bid documents. Cape Ann Loop Study (safety enhancements) completed by Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization.

2013

Salisbury joins as 14th byway community. An addendum to the Corridor Management Plan was prepared by Brown Walker Planners of Newburyport.

2012

The Essex Coastal Byway Guide by Joel Brown, 156 page publication, was released. 25,000 new scenic byway advertising rack card designed and distributed, funded by a grant from the North of Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau. Essex Heritage receives grant to plan, design, fabricate and install informational kiosks at nine visitor centers located along the scenic byway route. Principle funding provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) through the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program. Match funding provided by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation.

2011

Corridor Management Plan completed by Brown Walker Planners of Newburyport. New Scenic byway logo designed by George Courage of New Arts Collaborative New scenic byway webpage launched on Essex Heritage website Essex Heritage receives grant to plan, design, fabricate and install directional signs along the scenic byway route. Principle funding provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) through the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program. Match funding provided by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation.

2009

Work begins on the federally required Corridor Management Plan for the scenic byway; planning firm Brown Walker Planners of Newburyport were contracted to prepare the plan.

2006

Essex Heritage receives second of two grants to prepare a federally required Corridor Management Plan for the scenic byway. Principle funding provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) through the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program. Match funding provided by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation .

2005

On June 30, 2005, Governor Mitt Romney signs legislation designating a state scenic byway route linking the communities of Lynn, Swampscott, Marblehead, Salem, Beverly, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Gloucester and Rockport (includes portions of Rtes. 127, 114 and 1A). Essex Heritage receives first of two grants to prepare a federally required Corridor Management Plan for the scenic byway. Principle funding provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) through the National Scenic Byways Discretionary Grants Program. Match funding provided by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation.

2003

On November 20, 2003, the Massachusetts General Court passes legislation designating a state scenic byway route linking the communities of Gloucester, Essex, Ipswich, Rowley, Newbury and Newburyport (includes portion of Rtes. 133 and 1A).

Early 2000's

Essex Heritage launches regional initiative to develop a state designated scenic byway route within the Essex National Heritage Area (Essex County) in northeastern Massachusetts.